Parents hope kids appreciate old-school toys and games - Fox 2 News Headlines

Parents hope kids appreciate old-school toys and games

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It's no real surprise that "Call of Duty Black Ops 2" has already grossed $1 billion in sales this holiday season, including $500 million within the first 24 hours of its release. It is now officially the fastest-earning entertainment product of all time.

Zombies might better describe some kids these days. Don't get mad at us; we're not the ones saying it.

Felix von Perfall says all these video games have turned some children into "bird brains." The 8-year-old tells us it is better to really throw a football then toss one virtually.

Many parents we spoke to agree and prefer old school classics, like Battleship or Scrabble or Lincoln Logs and Lego blocks -- you remember those, right?

This holiday season parents are performing a little "black ops" of their own by quietly adding more old-school games to their kids' wish lists.

It's a comeback of sorts for retro games, such as air hockey.

Nostalgia is Mary Arnolds Toys' middle name. The 80-year-old Upper East Side store also sells newer, more tactile toys to play around with. And, of course, the Slinky, which was invented way back in 1943 by a Marine who accidentally knocked a metal spring off his desk. Nearly 70 years later, the Slinky tops the 2012 Scholastic Kids trend report.

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