US banks to send checks to 4.2M who lost homes - Fox 2 News Headlines

US banks to send checks to 4.2M who lost homes

Posted: Updated:

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The nation's largest banks will begin sending payments this week to millions of Americans who may have been wrongfully foreclosed on during the housing crisis.

A total of $3.6 billion in cash will be distributed to 4.2 million borrowers, the Federal Reserve and the U.S. Comptroller of the Currency said Tuesday. Payments will range from $300 to $125,000. About 90 percent of borrowers whose mortgages were serviced by 11 of the banks will receive payments by the end of April, the agencies said.

The last group of payments is expected in mid-July.

The banks, which include Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and Citigroup, reached a settlement with the federal agencies in January. They agreed to pay a total $9.3 billion in cash and in reductions of mortgage balances.

The 13 banks settled the regulators' complaints that they wrongfully foreclosed on borrowers with abuses such as "robo-signing," or automatically signing off on foreclosures without properly reviewing documents.

The settlement covers foreclosures in 2009 and 2010. It ended an independent review of loan files that the two agencies ordered in 2011.

Banks and consumer advocates had complained that the loan-by-loan reviews were time-consuming and costly and didn't reach many affected borrowers. Some questioned the independence of the consultants who performed the reviews, who often ruled against borrowers.

Consumer advocates have criticized the deal, saying the regulators settled for too low a price by letting banks avoid full responsibility for wrongful foreclosures.

The other banks in the settlement are HSBC, MetLife Bank, PNC Financial Services, Sovereign, SunTrust, U.S. Bank, Aurora, Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs.

  • Your MoneyMore>>

  • IRS considers taxing work freebies like food

    IRS considers taxing work freebies like food

    Wednesday, April 16 2014 9:11 PM EDT2014-04-17 01:11:44 GMT
    In competitive job markets like Silicon Valley, companies are doing everything they can to entice the best and brightest -- offering freebies that have become the stuff of legend.Employee perks like free food at lavish cafeterias, laundry and even yoga are not unheard of.  But the taxman could soon crack down.  The IRS reportedly is looking at these perks and seeing if these companies need to start paying up for the free stuff they offer employees.
    In competitive job markets like Silicon Valley, companies are doing everything they can to entice the best and brightest -- offering freebies that have become the stuff of legend.Employee perks like free food at lavish cafeterias, laundry and even yoga are not unheard of.  But the taxman could soon crack down.  The IRS reportedly is looking at these perks and seeing if these companies need to start paying up for the free stuff they offer employees.
  • Social streaming video from your iPhone with YEVVO

    Social streaming video from your iPhone with YEVVO

    Wednesday, April 16 2014 8:46 AM EDT2014-04-16 12:46:01 GMT
    We met YEVVO's 26-year-old co-founder and CEO, Ben Rubin, on a rainy day in Madison Square Park. Among the four of us (Ben, me, my photographer, and the representative from Ben's PR firm), we had four smartphones and the free app Rubin created."What if you were going live during this interview and then somebody [online] started asking questions and then [that somebody] actually helped to create the content?" Rubin asked.
    We met YEVVO's 26-year-old co-founder and CEO, Ben Rubin, on a rainy day in Madison Square Park. Among the four of us (Ben, me, my photographer, and the representative from Ben's PR firm), we had four smartphones and the free app Rubin created."What if you were going live during this interview and then somebody [online] started asking questions and then [that somebody] actually helped to create the content?" Rubin asked.
  • Heartbleed: Android devices may be vulnerable

    Heartbleed: Android devices may be vulnerable

    Tuesday, April 15 2014 10:14 PM EDT2014-04-16 02:14:46 GMT
    If you've heard about the Heartbleed bug, maybe you've already changed all your passwords and online security information. But Android users may still be at risk. Lance Ulanoff, senior editor of the online tech site Mashable, explains: "For the most part, Heartbleed has really been about the services that you access, and not local devices so the encryption on the device may have the same vulnerability."
    If you've heard about the Heartbleed bug, maybe you've already changed all your passwords and online security information. But Android users may still be at risk. Lance Ulanoff, senior editor of the online tech site Mashable, explains: "For the most part, Heartbleed has really been about the services that you access, and not local devices so the encryption on the device may have the same vulnerability."
Powered by WorldNow

WJBK-TV | Fox 2
16550 West Nine Mile Rd.
Southfield, MI 48075

Main Station: (248) 557-2000
Newsroom: (248) 552-5103

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices