Grand Central Terminal vs. Penn Station: the cuisine - Fox 2 News Headlines

Grand Central Terminal vs. Penn Station: the cuisine

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Each day, thousands of commuters go through two of New York's busiest transit hubs: Grand Central Terminal and Penn Station. But when it comes to food choices some say the difference between the two is like night and day.

Grand Central's dining concourse is anchored by the legendary Oyster Bar, which has been serving up top-notch seafood since the terminal opened exactly 100 years ago. It's a mainstay for current and former New Yorkers.

The choices at the terminal continue: Indian, Thai and Sushi; or popular trendy places like Shake Shack, which just opened.

But if prefer cooking your own fish once you get home instead of going to Oyster Bar, on the second level take a look at Grand Central Market -- a full marketplace with produce, cheese vendors, a chocolatier and fresh seafood just waiting for you.

With such a bevy of food options here at Grand Central, we rushed to get over to Penn Station.

It is, um, different. Yes, that's the word: different. But it has legendary restaurants, too. The arches are known worldwide. And there are also many New York institutions at Penn as well: Nathan's and its world famous hot dogs, Duncan Donuts and Starbucks.

Want pizza? It's either Two Boots or Pizza Hut. Or a marketplace where you hear the great Ella Fitzgerald singing as you shop or Penn Station's market where you can hear "free samples, free soup samples."

Transit officials say New Yorkers know what they get when they go through both.

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