Dressing for the cold: layering the smart way - Fox 2 News Headlines

Dressing for the cold: layering the smart way

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) - The snow clean up in Westchester is going pretty well, but now people here have to face freezing temperatures. We came to Hickory and Tweed to check out some of the newest cold weather gear and we have you covered from head to toe. The store has some of the hottest cold weather technology.

It's an effort to stay warm in these freezing temperatures. Skip Beitzel, the store's owner, told us about hats, gloves, face masks, boots, and separate layers. To stay warm, Skip starts with a base layer by Hot Chillys. It's a polyester material that serves to wick away the moisture from your body. It also has a nice four-way stretch so it's very comfortable.

Next? The second layer is a Nano Puff jacket by Patagonia. It is made with Primaloft, an extremely light weight synthetic version of down. The jacket weighs about 9 ounces.

"My outer layer would be a very warm insulated jacket like this which is insulated by Thinsulate which is a synthetic material that takes the place of down," he says.

Skip says while down material is effective, it absorbs water, leaving you wet and cold.

And most importantly, Skip says don't forget your feet with a boot that has also has Thinsulate in it. He says it is extremely light weight, extremely warm.

You can finish off your warm weather outfit with a ski mask made of Mirofur and a pair of heated gloves, powered by a lithium-ion battery. You plug it in at night to recharge the battery. The following day, you essentially could be warm all day long.

But Skip says the easiest way to stay warm is old fashioned layering.

http://new.hickoryandtweed.com/
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