Risks of eye-whitening surgery - Fox 2 News Headlines

Risks of eye-whitening surgery

Posted: Updated:
MYFOXNY.COM -

Your eyes are first thing you see staring back at you when you look in the mirror. Eyes are literally a window into our health, emotions, personality and, of course, how we look to ourselves and to others. Now there is a relatively new medical cosmetic procedure some eye doctors are performing to surgically whiten the eyes.

Dr. J.P. Dunn, an eye surgeon and medical director at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia, says eye whitening works by surgically stopping blood flow to some of the blood vessels in the eyes. He says that by inhibiting blood vessel growth, the eye will look much whiter. But the procedure, only developed four years ago in Korea, is risky and not necessarily rewarding.

Dr. Dunn says vision loss has been reported but is rare. Also, you could end up with more redness and more irritation than you had before the surgery. He says he has had to surgically correct botched cosmetic eye whitening jobs. One patient came to him with ulcers in his eyes that if not treated could have led to blindness.

In fact, the procedure is so new it has a high rate of complications and has been banned in some countries.

It is also costly: $3,000 to $5,000 per eye.

The risks have not stopped people from requesting it in the ever ending quest for beauty. And we found plenty of doctors willing to do it.

So what can you do about chronic red eyes if you don't want cosmetic surgery? Doctors say get an eye exam. Redness could indicate an underlying, undiagnosed health problem. Also, medications can help. And don't smoke, avoid air pollution, and get enough sleep.

  • HealthMore>>

  • Celebrities, hangovers and concierge IV drips

    Celebrities, hangovers and concierge IV drips

    Wednesday, July 23 2014 10:21 PM EDT2014-07-24 02:21:17 GMT
    Just when you thought you have heard of everything we turn our attention to Hollywood for the latest in concierge medicine. Celebrity daughter and TV host Kelly Osborne recently showed off getting an IV drip. But she wasn't at a hospital. She was at home. She is one of many celebrities using expendable income on intravenous drips filled with things like saline, potassium, anti-inflammatory or anti-nausea meds, or vitamin B12 to help them recover from a hangover or exhaustion.
    Just when you thought you have heard of everything we turn our attention to Hollywood for the latest in concierge medicine. Celebrity daughter and TV host Kelly Osborne recently showed off getting an IV drip. But she wasn't at a hospital. She was at home. She is one of many celebrities using expendable income on intravenous drips filled with things like saline, potassium, anti-inflammatory or anti-nausea meds, or vitamin B12 to help them recover from a hangover or exhaustion.
  • Survey: teenagers' PED use is up

    Survey: teenagers' PED use is up

    Wednesday, July 23 2014 5:34 PM EDT2014-07-23 21:34:07 GMT
    Type "human growth hormone" into Google and you'll find pills, powders, and injections. Easy access is one reason more teenagers are experimenting with the performance-enhancing drug. The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids surveyed close to 4,000 students from 9th to 12th grade and their answers are alarming. The study claims the number of teenagers using HGH, or human growth hormone, has doubled in the last year, creating a lot of concern in the medical community.
    Type "human growth hormone" into Google and you'll find pills, powders, and injections. Easy access is one reason more teenagers are experimenting with the performance-enhancing drug. The Partnership for Drug-Free Kids surveyed close to 4,000 students from 9th to 12th grade and their answers are alarming. The study claims the number of teenagers using HGH, or human growth hormone, has doubled in the last year, creating a lot of concern in the medical community.
  • Two babies get herpes during ritual circumcision

    Two babies get herpes during ritual circumcision

    Wednesday, July 23 2014 3:06 PM EDT2014-07-23 19:06:48 GMT
    The New York City Department of Health has issued an alert after two babies were diagnosed with neonatal herpes this month after undergoing a ritual Jewish circumcision called metzitzah b'peh.  In this type of circumcision the mohel sucks blood directly from the infant's cut penis.  The infants need to be hospitalized and treated with intravenous acyclovir.
    The New York City Department of Health has issued an alert after two babies were diagnosed with neonatal herpes this month after undergoing a ritual Jewish circumcision called metzitzah b'peh.  In this type of circumcision the mohel sucks blood directly from the infant's cut penis.  The infants need to be hospitalized and treated with intravenous acyclovir.
Powered by WorldNow

WJBK-TV | Fox 2
16550 West Nine Mile Rd.
Southfield, MI 48075

Main Station: (248) 557-2000
Newsroom: (248) 552-5103

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices